Training in Traditional Chinese Medicine

When you're ready to achieve your degree or certificate in one of the world's most ancient healing arts, then you should acquire training in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). With programs ranging from certification in Tuina (Chinese medical massage) to a doctorate in Oriental medicine, the educational options are wide open.

To earn your masters in acupuncture and Oriental medicine (MSTOM), training in traditional Chinese medicine entails anatomy and physiology, pharmacology, acupuncture and oriental medicine (fundamentals, diagnosis, and treatment); acupuncture point locations, applications and theory; acupuncture and needling techniques; auricular acupuncture (ear acupuncture), Tai Chi, Qi Gong, Chinese herbology, Eastern nutrition, Tuina, moxibustion, cupping, and more.

If you're interested in becoming a professional doctor of acupuncture and Oriental medicine (DAOM) practiceer, comprehensive training in traditional Chinese medicine is critical. While courses vary with respect to prerequisites, general doctrine programs require a great deal of commitment; usually over 1,200 training hours. In addition to philosophies, principles and training in traditional Chinese medicine (and advanced studies of the masters program), coursework includes family medicine, medical Chinese language, and application of Chinese classics, among others.

Some training in traditional Chinese medicine colleges includes associate and bachelor degree programs as well. These courses are often geared towards Eastern holistic health, nutrition, and herbal medicine.

If you're strapped for time but want to acquire some training in traditional Chinese medicine, you can apply to one of the many Asian bodywork or Tuina certification programs. In addition to learning about anatomy and physiology, students enrolled in these programs gain training in traditional Chinese medicine theories and philosophies, instrumental Tuina hand and structural techniques, Shiatsu, acupressure, Qi Gong, as well as basic CPR and first aid.

If you (or someone you know) are interested in learning more about these or other TCM programs, let professional training within fast-growing industries like massage therapy, naturopathy, acupuncture, herbal medicine, Reiki, and others get you started! Explore training in traditional Chinese medicine [http://school.holisticjunction.com/clickcount.php?id=6634739&goto=http://www.holisticjunction.com/search.cfm] near you.

Training in Traditional Chinese Medicine
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How to Buy Quality Mexican Insurance Online

Typical Mexican Insurance Online Problems:

1. Not buying car Insurance for Mexico

U.S. and Canadian auto insurance is NOT recognized in Mexico and is invalid due to territorial exclusions. Travelers who don’t have auto insurance for Mexico and have an accident may spend many hours or days in jail and have their vehicle confiscated.

2. Forgetting to Buy Emergency Medical Assistance with your Mexican Auto Insurance Online Policy.

Mexico is an adventure and can become a perilous journey without emergency assistance coverage.The majority of health providers in the States do not cover Mexico.

3. How to Find Mexican Insurance Online Website.

It is suggested that you purchase Mexican insurance Online before entering Mexico. Although Mexican car insurance can be purchased from various vendors just prior to crossing the border, you may have difficulty verifying if your coverage is adequate and from a quality carrier approved by the Mexican government. You will probably pay more than you need to!

4. Legal Help and Bail Bond Expenses.

Here is an area is often forgotten in policy coverage. Your Mexico Auto Insurance policy should include an endorsement for Legal Assistance and Bond Expenses.

5. When you buy coverage, you should receive the following items to take with you on your trip:

* Authentic and admitted Mexican auto insurance policy printed legibly in Spanish and English.

* Accident instructions and important policy information.

* Essential phone numbers (Vital to keep on you in your wallet as well as in your vehicle)

* Car Insurance Premium payment receipt.

* Mexican Insurance ID cards with your certificate number and important phone numbers identified as working in Mexico or good in the US.

Make sure your plan covers your entire stay. All companies have daily, weekly, and yearly policies. You may find it less expensive to buy coverage with a longer period if you plan to stay over 20- 25 days.

Keep the ID Cards in your wallet or purse and keep the Mexican Insurance Online certificate and accident instructions in your glove compartment.

It is very important to separate them in case your car is stolen, or the authorities take your papers (frequently they don’t give them back) and you need to call the insurance company for translation or legal help.

The Biggest Challenge For Cloud Computing In 2012

Cloud computing has become quite the buzzword in the IT world. Whether you prefer to use the term cloud services, cloud hosting, cloud computing, or whatever … you need to be aware of the challenges and what you're getting into before you jump right into it.

Security always appears top of the list, coupled with what I interpret as confusion over how and what is needed to make best use of the cloud. So in short, for me, a lack of understanding remains the challenge. Whilst security is critical, I feel the need to provide some counter points.

Any computer connected to the Internet is at risk from hackers, whether it is in the cloud or in a private data center. Would it be true to say that an SME, with necessarily limited resources, is able to better secure its data than say Amazon? In addition, who says everything needs to be in the cloud? Adopting a cloud computing strategy is not an 'all or nothing' decision. Data can remain within a data center or on promise, while applications that need to access such data can be based in the cloud. That's the whole principle behind the different cloud types – private, public or hybrid.

I think that anyone considering a move to the cloud needs to carefully consider their motivations and objectives for doing so, and to question what data and workflows they and their customers will feel happy placing in the cloud. Most importantly, select a vendor that can accommodate your cloud migration strategy, now and in the future. The challenge in 2012 is not that of cloud computing, the challenge for cloud vendors or providers of Cloud 'services' is that they need to not only promote the benefits of their particular offering, but also educate the market on the benefits of cloud, full stop.

Another major challenge will be Bandwidth. It's probably the case that the majority of SME / Bs have 'plenty' of local network bandwidth with which to conduct their in-house operations / business, however, it's also probably the case that in their pipe (s) into the 'Cloud' and that could be an awkward bottleneck if you swallowed the cloud philosophy without adequate preparation – which, of course, you'd never do.

For the pessimists amongst you, please see Moore's Law and Nielson's Law, there's always Parkinson's Law, which reads: "Usage expends so as to fill all available bandwidth."

A Brand New Recipe For Branding

In a recent article, I told the story of when I was a young whippersnapper, attaining classes at what was then and still is called "one of the more famous hotel schools in North America", the marketing professor gave us an interesting, but quite challenging assignment.

We were to find a hospitality business that marketed itself by using the participation of the owner as part of the "distinctiveness" of the business. At the time, this seemed like a most difficult assignment, because in those days, it seemed that not too many people really stood out in this field. At least that what it seemed like to me in my youth. Or maybe it was just that they did not want to either make a fool of themselves. There seemed little need to drive the world to their door. I chose a very different restaurant enclosed within an old 19th century Mansion in this very cosmopolitan city. It was called Julie's Mansion and was owned and operated by a very eccentric, but wonderful showman who knew that he had to differentiate his restaurant from all the rest. He knew that the best way to do that – after the assumption of great food, entertainment and service – was to turn himself into the "brand."

My job, as a young hospitality student, was to watch him carefully and learn as much as I could. One Saturday night I showed up and Julie was trying to 'insert' himself into the home team's pro hockey uniform. It was immediately obvious that Julie had never played hockey. To see a middle-aged man struggling to get into and then have to have me extricate him from the jersey, equipment, elbow pads et al, was hilarious for a young guy like me, who had been on skates and playing the game since age four. He certainly was not afraid to make a fool of himself. When I showed up that night, he had less than no idea what piece of equipment went where, and was struggling with the shin guards. He had got himself all tangled up with what he thought were hip guards, when in fact they were shoulder pads, worn over the shoulders. It was indeed the first time I had ever seen a 'player' wearing shoulder pads, stretched around his butt.

I helped him get 'dressed'. Next came the taping of the hockey stick. This was really hilarious, watching this fellow trying to figure out the right way to tape a hockey stick without making a mess of it and looking foolish to his customers. He had a special plan for that stick.

I taped his stick and now he was ready. He had on his uniform, equipment and helmet, borrowed from one of the local NHL players who were a frequent guest at the mansion. Now, he actually looked like a real NHL hockey player … in black and white running shoes, sans skates!

Then Julie 'flew through' the different alcoves and floors of the restaurant with a big ball of foodservice aluminum foil as his 'puck'. He stick-handled in and out and between tables, took shots with the aluminum ball off the walls, cross-checked his own waiters trying to serve tables, all the while yelling cheers and the phrase made famous' round the world, by Foster Hewitt : "he shoots …. he scores!" All this, at the top of his lungs. Then he had planned for a horn to sound loudly indicating that the 'period of play' in his imaginary 'game' was over. It was now time to go to the dressing room. In a flash, just like an on-stage magician, he quickly disappeared into thin air, hidden in his office.

My face was covered in tears. I could not stop laughing! The restaurant was in an uproar. Guests were laughing so hard … one guy literally fell off his chair. The waiters were laughing, the guests were laughing, I was laughing and all the while Julie was having a ball too. Here was a restaurateur who made his work fun.

I had not met one of these types before. I really liked and respected this fellow. But I figured then, and still today, that anyone who had that much fun … and made that much money … must know something the others did not. And he did. He became his own brand. 'Distinctive. 'Differentiated. 'There is attractive to people who are sick of seeing the same old, same old every day. People are attracted to differences not similarities. Take a look at what you can do with yours. It's right under your own nose.

© Copyright, Roy W. MacNaughton, 2006